My Photo
Blog powered by Typepad
Member since 03/2005

October 2013

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31    

« Combox Crit #1 Redux | Main | The Big Mac of Beers »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e54ecb4e39883300e54fabfc398834

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Driven to Pray:

Comments

Del

For me, the daily commute and the Rosary are made for each other (except during motorcycle season).

On the other hand, I once made a motorcycle pilgrimage to the Ozarks, just to pray in thanksgiving for the joy of God's Country!

The Aesthetic Elevator

I read in a biography once that D.L. Moody felt the same way. He once, therefore, tried to pray through the night like some of his friends and ended up falling asleep on his knees.

I think such guilt is a problem in the church, where we end up comparing our spirituality one to another instead of just seeking to live in a "Kingdom" manner, using our gifts and every part of our lives to the glory of God. Some are gifted with intercession, others like Moody are gifted with evangelism. All of us should cultivate to the best of our ability a variety of spiritual disciplines, but to think we'll be pros at all of them is a form of uninspired legalism that needs to be flushed out of our Christian mentality.

Personally, I like to pray while walking alone after dark.

Tim J.

I'm afraid the dogs in my neighborhood wouldn't approve, TAE. :-)

We have a few early-morning joggers, but walking around at night you would probably end up guest-starring on some local cop's dash cam.

You're right about legalism. It's like gravity... a constant tug. We have to let the Holy Spirit root it out of us every so often or it begins to take over.

Esau

You're right about legalism. It's like gravity... a constant tug. We have to let the Holy Spirit root it out of us every so often or it begins to take over.


Tim J.,

What legalism are you and TAE referring to exactly?

If it is referring to the practices that the Church encourages, such as the Divine Office and such, these are not mandatory but rather devotional practices the Church encourages.

Even our Anglican brethren acknowledges the importance of the Divine Office themselves:

The chief end of the Divine Office is the sanctification and marking of time. "Watch ye therefore: for ye know not when the master of the house cometh, at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or in the morning: Lest coming suddenly he find you sleeping. And what I say unto you I say unto all, Watch." (St. Mark 13:35-37). As a result, the various Hours of the Office are distributed throughout the day.

and here:

Regular daily prayer appears to have both been inherited from the Jewish Church and an outgrowth of the extended apostolic Eucharist. In accordance with Psalm 119:164 -- "Seven times a day do I praise Thee" -- devout Jews would offer prayers and psalms periodically throughout the day, and such services were a feature of synagogue worship in the days of the Apostles.


Now, that's not to say that if you don't practice such devotion, you're a darn poor excuse for a Christian.

The only purpose of such devotions is keeping Christ present to the Christian all hours of the day -- thus, it is called also "The Liturgy of the Hours".

Esau

The latter paragraph should have read:

The only purpose of such devotions is keeping Christ present in the Mind of the Christian all hours of the day (i.e., to devote every hour of one's life to Christ) -- thus, it is called also "The Liturgy of the Hours".

The Aesthetic Elevator

I used the word "legalism" to convey what is sometimes referred to as "super-spiritual." (I'm writing from a non-denominational perspective, personally, not Catholic, if this makes any difference in your understanding my position.)

I'm all for cultivating spiritual disciplines. What I don't like is how Christians can end up being judged by how often they read their Bible, how often they pray and so forth. Hence my reference to Moody's attempt at all-night prayer. I was likening the pressure to conform to these disciplines or be considered less spiritual as a form of legalism. The disciplines themselves are worthy, but there are no specific guidelines in Scripture as to how much or how little a person must act on them in order to be "spiritual."

Perhaps "legalism" wasn't the best term for this, but it is what worked for me at the time. The super-spiritual phenom seems to have passed to a degree anyway, being something in retrospect that seems to have plagued the church from the late 80s into the earliest 21st century by my own estimation.

The comments to this entry are closed.